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From Michael Phelps to business lesson (Part 2)

2. Conquer your own mentality

One of the best therapies used by Phelps before a game is sense of breath. This is said to stimulate blood circulation in the body, helping energy circulate better. Another thing Phelps likes to do is listen to music until the very last moment before entering the competition. In 2005, Phelps told The Guardian that “it relaxes me, and takes me into my own little world”.

When Bowman first coached Phelps, he noticed that Phelps had problems coping with stress and his ability to calm down before race. Later, Bowman bought a book about relaxation exercises that read something like this: “Clench your hands into fists and relax. Imagine the tension slowly melting. ” Then he asked Phelps’s mother to read this again to Phelps every night so he could relax his body before going to bed.

Achieving a state of calm can be a bit difficult for many business owners, and it’s really hard to do with a chaotic mind and a tense body. Take the time to find effective relaxation techniques, especially when stressful situations are hidden ahead. A comfortable mind will give us wise choices in business as well as in life.


3. Cultivate good habits


Bowman believes the secret behind Phelps’ victories is the creation of good habits, which helps Phelps become the strongest mentally challenged swimmer. When Phelps was a teenager, Bowman asked Phelps to imagine a perfect race and how he would win it.

Once some core habits are established, all other habits such as maintaining the right diet, exercising muscle tension, and sleeping time properly will automatically appear. According to an article in the Baltimore Sun , Phelps rarely stayed up late after 10 p.m. He also wears devices to determine the depth of sleep and a detailed tracking sheet for each food he consumes each day.

Great business owners will achieve their goals if they pay attention to the habits they build on a daily basis. Good habits will help them solve problems, build good relationships with others, and come up with new ideas that can make their business viable with challenges and time.

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From Michael Phelps to business lesson

The rules that make Michael Phelps the most Olympic medalist in history will also help you win the marketplace.

Becoming a business owner is like becoming a professional athlete. You must have strict discipline in managing your own time and resources. You have to be really calm to face the pressure of giving presentations to investors or advising difficult clients. And most importantly, you must be highly focused on achieving the goals you have set for yourself and your company.

So, what athletes can do all of the above?

That is Michael Phelps.

At the end of the 2016 Olympics held in Rio de Janeiro, Phelps brought 5 gold and 1 silver medal to the United States. This achievement also brought the total number of medals he won to 28 (including 23 gold), something no one else in history has done. Phelps also announced that this is his last Olympics. However, I do not know if this is true because, after the end of the 2012 Olympics in London, he said the same thing.

Regardless of whether Phelps will retire in the next Olympics, here are three pocket things you can learn from him.


1. Let challenges lead you to success


An article on the Olympics.org site said Phelps was diagnosed with attention deficit disorder (ADD) as a child. Therefore, swimming has been recommended by the doctor to the Phelps family as a remedy for this. No one expected that when the boy Phelps started swimming at the age of 7, one day he would break a series of records to become the most successful Olympic athlete of all time.

In 2014, Phelps was arrested for driving while drunk, which forced him to find a way to quit drinking and take a strict self-examination. An article by the Baltimore Sunsaid that after going through that incident, he “raised his love of work to a new level”. And when village coach Bob Bowman visits Phelps in a re-education center in Arizona, he finds that he “seems determined to have to deal with the darkest patches of his past”.

As a business owner, sooner or later you will find yourself falling into unintended adversity. Successful people move forward in the midst of challenges, and turn transient failures into spark that ignites the desire to win ultimately.